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Do we Live in Fascist Nation

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The idea that the U.S. State Department and military are arms of U.S. banks and corporations is a contentious one. If the U.S. foreign policy was fascist by definition it would be driven by the interests of big business instead of being based on national security concerns and geopolitical interests. That being the case it is easy to see why many people believe we live in a fascist nation.

There is no doubt that U.S. corporations have significant influence on U.S. foreign policy.
Many large corporations have significant lobbying power in Washington D.C. They use that power to push their agendas on foreign policy decisions. For example, the U.S. government has a long history of supporting coups and dictatorships in foreign countries if they are seen as beneficial to U.S. corporate interests.

One example of this is the overthrow of the democratically elected government of Iran in 1953. The coup was orchestrated by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in cooperation with British intelligence. It was motivated by a desire to protect British and U.S. oil interests in the country. These interests were threatened by the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry by the democratically elected government of Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh.

Another example is the U.S. government’s support for the military dictatorship in Chile led by General Augusto Pinochet. The U.S. government supported the Pinochet regime because it was seen as friendly to U.S. business interests. This despite the regime’s human rights abuses and suppression of democracy.

Military Use is Indicative of a Fascist Nation

In addition to supporting dictators, the U.S. government has also used military force to protect U.S. corporate interests in foreign countries. For example, the U.S. government has a long history of using military force to secure access to oil reserves in the Middle East. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 was partly motivated by a desire to secure control over Iraqi oil reserves.

The U.S. government has also used military force to protect U.S. corporate interests in other industries. The U.S. has a long history of supporting banana companies in Central America, leadiing to U.S. military intervention in the region.

a fascist nation

Do you live in a fascist nation?

It is important to note that U.S. foreign policy is not solely driven by corporate interests. National security concerns and geopolitical interests also play a significant role in foreign policy decisions. For example, the U.S. government’s support for Israel is motivated by a desire to maintain a strong ally in the Middle East. This is in stark contrast to a desire to protect U.S. corporate interests.

While U.S. corporate interests do play a significant role in U.S. foreign policy decisions, it is debatable as to whether it is a fascist nation. Are the U.S. State Department and military are simply arms of U.S. banks and corporations? Smedley Butler said as much a hundred years ago. Foreign policy decisions are complex and are motivated by a variety of factors. These include national security concerns, geopolitical interests, and maybe most importantly – economic interests.